REACH Substance Evaluation – First impressions and legal issues
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (6/2014)
Although the process may share some characteristics with dossier evaluation according to Article 40, 41 of REACH, there are some peculiarities concerning the process of substance evaluation. Specifically, differences exist concerning the procedure, the scope of potential data requests as well as the target group of affected registrants.

Recycling activities at the interface of waste legislation and REACH
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (1/2014)
If one looks first at the REACH Regulation, the matter of waste is dealt with as follows: waste as defined in EU waste law is not a substance, mixture or article within the meaning of REACH (Article 2(2) of the REACH Regulation). Thus, the REACH Regulation is not applicable to waste and, consequently, there are no REACH obligations for the wastestage; i.e. in respect of the collection, treatment and disposal of waste. However, the exemption of Article 2(2) of the REACH Regulation does no longer apply, if substances (on their own, or in mixtures or in articles) are recovered from waste.

EU and US Regulatory Approaches to Information on Chemicals in Products: Implications for Consumers
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (12/2012)
Information dissemination across the supply chain to consumers about chemicals’ hazardous properties and presence in consumer products has been recognized as insuffi cient to improve to enable both producers and end-users to avoid hazardous chemicals and to manage risks to human health and the environment.

Aarhus and Agrochemicals: The Scope and Limitations of Access Rights in Europe
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (5/2012)
Access to information on dangerous chemical substances is of increased interest to stakeholders, in particular to those who involve themselves in environmental matters. Recently, a number of court proceedings have been instituted with the aim to enforce access rights, based on the EU legislation pertaining to transparency in general or alternatively on the legislation implementing the Aarhus Convention. The action brought by ClientEarth and the International Chemical Secretariat against the EChA regarding access to documents containing the names of the registrants of certain dangerous substances under REACH, and the tonnages in which they are placed on the EU market, is just one example. Also in the crop protection sector, the number of actions based on the Aarhus legislation has increased.

RISKCYCLE project: a new approach for assessing the risk of chemicals in a circular economy
© Institut für Abfall- und Kreislaufwirtschaft - TU Dresden (9/2011)
The global trade of products that occurs since some years ago is directly related with the chemical flows. For example, products produced in China are sold in the USA and then recycled in Vietnam. This flow of material involves a movement of chemicals at the same global scale since the differents products that are traded (plastic toys, textiles, electronic appliances, paper, etc.) incorporate different chemical additives. These chemicals are added to the products in order to give them certain desired properties: flame resistance, protection to UV light, conductivity, color, etc. Therefore, many potential hazardous compounds are traded as chemicals or incorporated as additives in products.

Product Liability Risks for the Chemicals Industry – Recent Developments in China and the United States
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (8/2011)
This is Part Two of a two-part publication on the recent legal developments with regard to product liability risks for companies in the Chemicals industry. This combined effort was undertaken by various members of the Hogan Lovells Global Chemicals Product Liability Industry group. This second part focuses on China and the U.S. The respective authors are Eugene Chen and Yuping Zhao (both China) and Trevor Jefferies, Eric Statman, Matthew Galvin and Courtney Colligan (all U.S.). The first part, published in June 2011, focused on recent developments in Germany, the UK, Italy and France.

Product Liability Risks for the Chemicals Industry – Recent Developments in Europe
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (6/2011)
The present publication is a multi-jurisdictional overview on recent legal developments with regard to product liability risks for companies from the Chemicals industry. This combined effort was undertaken by various members of the Hogan Lovells Global Chemicals Product Liability Industry group. This two-part publication will in its first part focus on recent developments in Germany, the UK, Italy and France. The respective authors are Dr. Sebastian Lach (Germany), Dr. Hannah von Falkenhausen (Germany), Alex Woods (UK), Christian Di Mauro (Italy), Thomas Rouhette and Christelle Coslin (both France). The second part will focus on China and the US. The respective authors of these country parts are Trevor Jefferies, Courtney Colligan (both US) and Eugene Chen (China).

Independent Scientific Advice: Comparing Policies on Conflicts of Interest in the EU and the US
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (6/2011)
This article highlights the importance of unbiased scientific advice in the European Union’s legal system. It then analyses and compares the policies in force throughout the European Food Safety Authority, European Medicines Agency and European Commission’s Scientific Committees with the one implemented by the US Food and Drugs Administration.

Risk vs Hazard and the Two Souls of EU Risk Regulation: A Reply to Ragnar Lofstedt
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (6/2011)
When called upon to regulate risk, the EU carries the threefold onus to (i) protect its people(s); (ii) ensure the functioning of the internal market; and also (iii) to allocate the resources available wisely and efficiently.

Risk versus Hazard – How to Regulate in the 21st Century
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (6/2011)
In Europe, debate as to whether one should regulate chemicals based on intrinsic hazard or assessment of risk, or possibly a combination of both, has been gaining momentum.

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