Brave New World – Selected Jurisdictional Pitfalls when Acting on International Waste-to-Energy Projects
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Over the last few years, Waste-to-Energy (WtE) projects became increasingly international. In times of low interest rates, solid infrastructure projects with their fix return rates are more and more attractive to project developers, international investors as well as EPC and O&M contractors. They attract financial and strategic investors which would otherwise not turn towards these rather long-term investments. Therefore, a continuously increasing number of international players from different jurisdictions is entering the global playing field.

Development of Waste-to-Energy Projects
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
The first objective of waste management must always be to protect society and the health of individuals from harmful substances contained in the waste. Along the various methods around the globe with which waste has been treated the waste pyramid or waste management hierarchy has become widely accepted as the governing principle for waste management in modern societies. These principles have also been integrated in the European waste framework directive 2008/98/EC. At the bottom of the pyramid lays disposal of waste, meaning it is the least favourable option to treat a primary waste. However this does not mean implementing the waste pyramid prohibits disposal. It merely means that before disposal all other meaningful options are exhausted, and the quantity has been minimized.

In-Situ-Remediation of Pb/Zn Contaminated Sites Infl uenced by Mining and Processing
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
Worldwide many sites are presently influenced by mining and processing activities. The huge amounts of moved and treated materials have led to considerable flows of wastes and emissions. Alongside the many advantages of processed ores to our society, adverse effects in nature and risks for the environment and human health are observed.

Steel Slag Asphalt: Preventing the Waste of a High Quality Resource
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
Steel slag is the inevitable by-product of the production of steel, from both the conversion of iron to steel and the recycling of steel scrap. Historically, this material has been sent to a landfill as waste, but over the last 100 years or so, a variety of uses have been found for what has proven to be a high quality, valuable resource.

Recycling Concepts for Photovoltaic Modules
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
In the fi eld of renewable energies photovoltaic-technologies become more and more important. Therefore an increase of end of life panels can be expected in the next few years depending on the durability of the modules.

Framework Requirements for Harmonising Food Waste Monitoring
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
The overall problem when comparing food waste data is the lack of a common food waste Definition as well as different methodological approaches in use for quantifying food waste throughout the food supply chain (FSC). Both challenges are targeted by the FP7-funded project FUSIONS which runs between years 2012-2016.

Material Flow Analysis of Specific Nanomaterials in C&D Waste in Japan
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
The objective of this study is to clarify the material flow of specific nanomaterials with focus on construction materials to deviate its release scenarios for the end-of-life phase. The waste stream of construction and demolition (C&D) waste is very challenging because it is generated by both households and industry. Furthermore, the volume of C&D waste in Japan or in Austria is very high. Regarding nanotoxicity, the content of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in paints for construction materials is considerable. Chen et al. (2008) pointed out that SiO2 nanoparticles can easily be airborne because of their size. Kaegi et al. (2008 & 2010) have also shown that the nano-fraction of the whitening pigment (TiO2) and nano-Ag was released into surface water under real weather conditions from facade coatings.

SolidWasteSim – Simulation of Solid Waste Treatment
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
A critical analysis of mechanical processes in waste treatment plants hints at vulnerable spots in the interaction of plant units and deployed heterogeneous materials. The Simulation of mechanical processes in waste treatment may depict the total material flow in a plant and as such, contribute to a better understanding of the behaviour in heterogeneous materials, to identify bottlenecks, to check plant modifi cations and hence, to support planning and reducing time for implementation period.

Leakage control of Biogas plants
© European Compost Network ECN e.V. (6/2012)
Anaerobic digestion has become a very important technology to treat organic waste and to generate renewable energy. During construction and operation leaks at biogas plants may occur and methane is emitted. Further Authors: S. Neitzel - Systemtechnik Weser-Ems S. Kohne - esders Ltd

Composting of pic Faeces with corn stalks in China - Microbiological examinations; hygienic aspects and sanitation capacity
© European Compost Network ECN e.V. (6/2012)
With the increasing demand for meat (pork) the pig production in China increased over the last years,especially in the Northern East of China around mega cities like Beijing. Increasing pig production in large scale pigfarms head to enormous amounts of organic wastes (such as pig faeces), over-fertilization of agricultural areas andenvironmental pollution in regions with high pig production and density. Further Authors: Wang M., He C., Ling Y., Liu Y - China Agricultural University

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