VKU Opinion on the Study Bio Intelligence Service to the European Commission (GD ENV) on Implementing EU Waste Legislation for Green Growth
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (10/2012)
Environmental legislation is mostly established as a Framework at European Level. It thus defines the conditions for the activities of Member States as well as local waste Management utilities. VKU welcomes the fact that the authors of the study "Implementing EU Waste Legislation for Green Growth"¹ acknowledge the important role of local and regional public entities for the implementation of the EU waste legislation.

Reliable Waste Disposal And Clean Towns: Creating Sustainability By Involving The Local Population
© Eigenbeiträge der Autoren (11/2010)
Waste management and city cleaning –not a big thing, is it?

Evolution of a collection scheme in 15 years: quality and efficiency in the North Italian experience
© Wasteconsult international (6/2010)
When considering organic waste collection, quality is always a critical aspect. This work summarizes the experience of the Northern Italian waste management public consortium TV3 (Treviso Tre), which has been running residential source separation schemes of organic waste since the mid 1990s. Today the mature separate collection scheme shows contamination rates of less than 2% in the collected feedstock.

Lipor: biowaste strategy. The importance of selective collection
© European Compost Network ECN e.V. (10/2008)
As conclusion, with the project “Operação Restauração 5 Estrelas” it’s possible to send for composting the organicwaste produced by the restaurants, canteens and hotels assuring a high level of quality for the source separated material.

SOLUTIONS TO IMPROVE THE MSW COLLECTION IN LOUGA CITY, SENEGAL
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
This paper presents the results of a study conducted by CeTAmb, with the collaboration of two Italian NGOs (CESVI and CISV) and the local Municipality, in order to identify actions that could be adopted to improve the current MSW management in Louga. Louga (Figure 1) is a city placed in the northern part of Senegal, 200 km far from Dakar. Its territory spreads on a wide sandy plain whose altitude varies between 30 and 40 m above sea level. The region is characterised by a sahelian climate with a raining season (annual precipitation rate is about 300 mm/y) between July and September and a dry season from October to June.

COMPARISON OF TOTAL WASTE FLOW FROM HOUSEHOLDS IN 35 SWEDISH MUNICIPALITIES
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Since the Ordinance on Producer Responsibility for Packaging Materials was introduced in Sweden (SFS, 1993; SFS, 1994a; SFS, 1994b), the recycling efforts concerning household waste have been extended and intensified. A large number of different waste sorting programs have been developed locally. The responsibility for collection and recycling is divided between local authorities and producers, which has led to a shattered picture of the waste management strategies, and a rather complex task of evaluating the overall results.

CONCEPTUAL MODELS TO OPTIMIZE THE HAUL, TRANSFER AND DISPOSAL OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Linear and integer programming can be a useful decision support tool when optimizing solid waste management systems. Optimizing the haul, transfer and final disposal of MSW through linear programming has been a typical optimization problem since the ‘70s, when emphasis was given to finding the optimum collection routes (Truitt et al., 1969) as well as to determining facility locations and capacities (Esmaili, 1972; Kirka 1988; Or and Curi, 1993).

DIAGNOSIS OF THE SEPARATE WASTE COLLECTION OPTIMIZATION. SANTANDER (SPAIN) CASE STUDY.
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Santander is one of the most important tourist cities of northern Spain, with an estimated population of 185.000 inhabitants. As a modern European city, Santander performs municipal solid waste management satisfactorily, and has implemented a separate waste collection system since 2003. Currently it has an average production of municipal solid waste of 1.14 kilograms per inhabitant per day, with a recycling rate of 39.9, 22.7 and 30.0 per cent of paper and cardboard, packaging, and glass respectively. (Session A6: Waste collection)

THE CITY OF STAVANGER BRINGS THE HOUSEHOLD WASTE UNDERGROUND
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Each inhabitant in Stavanger produces an annual amount of about 430 kg of household waste (see table 1). More than 80% of this is collected at the household from a 3-bin system. In addition hazardous waste and smaller WEEE-goods are collected from each household twice a year. Almost all other types of waste can be delivered to one of the 48 unmanned recycling points or at the manned recycling station. The level of source separation amounts to the quite high portion of 65%. The separated waste is mainly recycled into new materials, including compost. (Session A6: Waste collection)

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