Recycling Concepts for Photovoltaic Modules
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
In the fi eld of renewable energies photovoltaic-technologies become more and more important. Therefore an increase of end of life panels can be expected in the next few years depending on the durability of the modules.

Improvement of hazardous waste management in Turkey through introduction of a web-based system for data collection and quality control
© Wasteconsult international (6/2010)
The Waste Framework Directive (WASTE FRAMEWORK DIRECTIVE, 2008) specifies certain measures to ensure that waste is recovered or disposed of in accordance with Article 13, i.e. without endangering human health or harming the environment. Specific measures laid down in the WFD include the introduction and common use of appropriate classification systems (LoW: Art. 7; recovery and disposal codes: Annex I and II), the principle of producer responsibility (Art. 14, Art. 15), the issue of permits for waste treatment facilities (Art. 23), the drafting of waste management plans (Art. 28), the requirement that the actors of waste management shall be subject to appropriate periodic inspections (Art 34) and their obligation to keep records on their activities (Art. 35).

LESSONS FROM DEVELOPMENT OF VENOUS INDUSTRIAL PARKS IN JAPAN AND CHINA AS MESO-SCALE WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
In the past decades, the whole world especially Asia achieved rapid economic growth, which brought significant economic benefit for human, but at the same time, caused heavy environmental burden and severe resource issues. Accompanied with the “mass production, mass consumption” development model, mass waste was produced and brought serious environmental problem. Now, Japan faces the big problem of scarcity of landfill.

STRATEGIES AND TOOLS TO ESTABLISH AN INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN THE FAST GROWING URBAN CENTER ILOILO CITY, PANAY, PHILIPPINES
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Iloilo City is the center of the second largest urban region in the Visayas, an island group forming the central part of the Phillipines, the hub of the newly established Metro Iloilo- Guimaras Economic Development Council (MIGEDC). It is located southeast of Panay Island with a population of 366,000. However, during daytime, the actual population of the city alone reaches half a million, when visitors use or incoming employees work in regional institutions such as universities, hospitals, banks, airport, seaport, and commercial centers which offer special services. Together with its other neighboring MIGEDC municipalities the urban region totals to about 806,549 in population and may become another Mega-Center with a total land area of 988.67 sq.km..

FULL-SCALE AEROBIC COMPOSTING OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE OF ISTANBUL METROPOLITIAN
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Composting is a desirable technique to recover the organic fraction of solid wastes for municipalities. It offers the obvious beneficial uses of the resources and creates a useful product from organic waste that would otherwise be landfilled. Since the European Landfill Directive (EU 1999/31) requires the reduction of significant organic part of the MSW to be landfilled, composting has become the viable alternative to landfills. Among the alternatives for the elimination of MSW, composting is widely accepted as the most sustainable strategy for the decomposition and stabilization of the organic fraction of MSW (Hansen et al., 1993; Chefetz et al., 1996).

APPLICATION OF NIR (NEAR INFRARED) SPECTROSCOPY FOR RAPID, EASY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE ANALYSIS OF COMPOST DERIVED FROM DOMESTIC ORGANIC WASTE MATERIAL
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
The compost is the result of aerobic natural degradation processes of the organic matter. This material is obtained by the degradation of the domestic solid waste material coming from differentiated collection. In Italy, the compost is commercialized and employed as fertilizer and/or conditioner in industrial agriculture, horticulture, fruit growing, cultivations, and to realize an maintain public green areas. With the aim to assure the quality of compost, a series of quality parameters have been defined for the fertilizers to be possessed for their commercialization and use (law 748/84, and D.M. 27 March 1998). These laws define the limits for the chemo-physical parameters of the fertilizers, and also define the analytical controls to be performed to ensure compost quality.

CROP PRODUCTION AND NITROGEN LEACHING RESULTING FROM BIOWASTE AND ONION COMPOST AMENDED SAND
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Organic waste recycling to land is expected to increase following the implementation of the EC strategy on the prevention and recycling of waste (COM 2003) and the landfill Directive (CEC 1999) which restricts the disposal of organic rich materials in landfills. Composting of organic waste and the land application of the end product is one of the main waste management options, and it may contribute to the improvement of soil fertility, the carbon sequestration, and also to the reduction of methane production from degradation of organic waste in landfills (Smith, Brown & al 2001).

DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A NATIONWIDE LANDFILL RATING SYSTEM IN SWITZERLAND – A CONTRIBUTION TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Though landfilling is often seen as the least preferable waste management option in ecological terms (see, e.g., ERIKSSON et al., 2005), it is very likely that landfills will continue to play a crucial role as final (or intermediate) sinks of our anthropogenic metabolism (BRUNNER, 2004) “for the foreseeable future” (ALLEN, 2001, p. 4; BUTT & ODUYEMI, 2003). The continuing importance of landfills in waste management is critical with respect to at least two prerequisites of the guiding concept of sustainable development (SD), intra-generative and inter-generative equity.

ASSESSEMENT OF WASTE OPERATORS PERFOMANCE: THE PORTUGUESE CASE
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
The activities of public water supply, waste water treatment and urban solid waste management are public services of a structural nature essential to general well-being, public health and the collective security of communities and businesses and environmental protection. These services should be governed by the principles of universal access, service continuity and quality, and price efficiency and equity. In the cases of public water supply and waste water treatment in particular, these services are natural local or regional monopolies, which requires a form of regulation that overcomes the absence of the self-regulation mechanisms that characterise competitive markets. In the absence of regulation, there are no incentives for operators to improve their efficiency and there is a risk of operators’ interests prevailing over those of users, with the risk that users will receive lower quality services at higher prices.

MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT: A METHODOLOGY TO MONITOR THE SERVICE QUALITY
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Efficiency, quality, sustainable prices, and availability of public services contribute to determine the quality of life of citizens (Kirkpatrick and Lucio, 1995). Among these services, the municipal solid waste services, due to its direct influence on the urban environment, to the resulting cost on the citizens, and to the competing private companies, still necessitates significant improvement with regard to efficiency and resources (human, financial and structural) allocation.

 1  2  3 . . . >
Username:

Password:

 Keep me signed in

Forgot your password?