Recycling Concepts for Photovoltaic Modules
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
In the fi eld of renewable energies photovoltaic-technologies become more and more important. Therefore an increase of end of life panels can be expected in the next few years depending on the durability of the modules.

The Specialised Certified Waste Management Companies in the Austrian Legal Framework
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2012)
With the publication of an Ordinance in the Austrian Law Gazette on Mai 4, 2012 the certification for "specialised certified waste management companies" (Entsorgungs-fachbetrieb (EFB)) got its finally received long desired acknowledgement by law. This ordinance is based on § 15 Umweltmanagementgesetz Law on Management of the Environment).

bifa-Text Nr. 42: CDM - Clean Development Mechanism in the waste management sector
© bifa Umweltinstitut GmbH (10/2009)
An analysis of potentials and barriers within the present methodological framework

THE CHARACTERISTIC OF LEACHATE AND CURRENT STATUS OF LEACHATE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY IN VIETNAM
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Leachate can be defined as a substance that permeates through solid waste layers in landfill which bring some soluble substances or suspended substances (Tchobanoglous etal., 1993). In most of landfill, leachate includes liquid going into landfill from out sources, such as surface water, rain fall, underground water and liquid generated from decomposition process of wastes.

LEACHATE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES AT LARGE TROPICAL LANDFILLS: A CASE STUDY
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
At tropical landfills, the demands on leachate management are often onerous and most acute in the initial stages of a landfill development. The daily and annual leachate generation rates can be very high, and leachate treatment can form a significant proportion of the landfill operating cost. Therefore, the development of an effective leachate management system is an essential part of the financial viability of a tropical landfill. Once the management system is developed, robust financial projections for leachate treatment throughout the life of a project can be derived. The Bukit Tagar landfill, near Kuala Lumpur, in Malaysia, illustrates the complexity of developing viable leachate management systems for tropical landfills, and highlights the importance of the relationships between the design, construction and operation.

WATER AND LEACHATE MANAGEMENT AT A SANITARY LANDFILL IN EXTREME TROPICAL CONDITIONS, KUCHING, SARAWAK, MALAYSIA
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Kuching Integrated Waste Management Park (KIWMP) is located in the state of Sarawak, Malaysia. It has three main components; sanitary landfill, secure landfill and a hazardous waste incinerator. This site was identified after an intensive geographical and geological research was carried out. The total area covers 112 ha. Both sanitary and secure landfill were constructed section by section using TRISOPLAST as the base liner which is a highly impermeable and in many respects, a liner of superior to conventional liner systems. This seems fit to the requirement of this “fast track” project which was completed on 30th October 2004. In 2005 at the 19th Sardinia Symposium a presentation about the Park in general has already been given (Damiecki et al, 2005). This presentation will focus on the water and leachate management system.

FULL REMEDIATION OF SHARJAH’S OLD LANDFILL
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Remediation of an old landfill requires the certain information about the nature and extent of the wastes to be available before the process of mining starts. Most important is an understanding of the composition of the deposited materials, their degradation potential (in relation to gas and leachate production) and likely dust emissions1. This information is essential in order to select the most appropriate method of treatment and any enabling works. Pertinent local features should be understood, such as water levels within the landfill or inclusion of hazardous materials such as asbestos in the waste.

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN SMALL MUNICIPALITIES: THE CASE HISTORY OF PIRAÍ (RJ), BRAZIL
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Urban solid waste management in developing countries has been one of the major problems faced by public administration, and many municipalities have deficient domestic waste collection, poor street cleaning services and their waste disposal in open dumps. The management of urban solid waste is presently a serious problem in the majority of Brazilian municipalities. Although there has been some improvement in the past few years, more than 70% of the municipalities still dispose of their waste in open dumps, with notorious consequences to the environment and public health. In Rio de Janeiro State, only three municipalities have sanitary landfills licensed by the Environment State Agency.

MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN CHENNAI CITY, INDIA
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Municipal Solid Waste includes commercial and residential wastes generated in municipal or notified areas, in either solid or semi-solid form excluding industrial hazardous wastes, but including treated bio-medical wastes (MoEF, 2000). The quality and quantity of MSW generated by a particular community will vary according to their socio-economic status, cultural habits, urban structure, population and commercial activities. Asian countries are facing MSWM problems due to the rapid growth in MSW generation rate. The total quantity of waste generated by 23 metro cities in India was 30,000 tpd in 1999, which has increased considerably to about 52,000 tpd (Inance et al, 2004).

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN THE CITY OF SMEDEREVSKA PALANKA
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
An integrated approach to planning the use and management of land resources entails the involvement of all interested parts in the process of decision making on the future of the land, and the identification and evaluation of all waste management attributes of land units. This requires the identification and establishment of a use or non-use of each land unit that is technically appropriate, economically viable, socially acceptable and environmentally nondegrading. A purely sectored approach to the planning of land resources and waste management should be avoided, as this may lead to their irreversible degradation.

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