Recovery of Critical Metals from Rinsing Water by Zero-Valent Iron
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
Raw materials, which are of great economic importance, but for which the risk of supply bottlenecks is valid, are considered as “critical”. Others, where this risk might occur due to market changes are called “potentially critical” (FFG 2012). The following metals are defined as (potentially) critical raw materials either by the EU or by the FFG: Be, Mg, Mn, Ni, Co, Zn, Cr, Al, Ga, In, rare earth elements (REE), Ge, Sb, Nb, Ta, W, V, Mo, platinum group elements (PGE).

Investigated for the First Time: The Recycling Chain of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment in an Entire German State
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
1,730,794t of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) were brought on the German market in 2010. 722,567t of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) were collected from private households but only about 1.1% of those were reused.

Dynamic Variation of Material Composition of Secondary Ores
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
Through the application of high-functional and strategically important metals, waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) has been discussed recently as a secondary “ore”. Potential future supply risks of these specifi c materials lead to the necessity of a specialized recycling of electronic goods.

Resource-Oriented Recycling of Electrical and Electronic Equipment
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
Electrical and electronic equipment is a source of scarce metals such as indium, gallium and rare earth elements. Recycling is one of the most important strategies to ensure the continued supply of such elements.

Electronic Scrap: Do We Set the Right Priorities?
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2014)
The debate about recycling of electronic waste usually focuses on information and communication technology (IT) and the recovery of critical raw materials (here critical metals) as a key issue.

WEEE Recast - Status and Prospect
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (10/2012)
Electrical and electronic appliances are a fast growing product Group with high diversification. The products contain recyclable material as metals, Plastics and rare earths, but also materials, inter alia in hte glass of Picture tubes, fridges, LCD-Screens and Computer boards. Their proper disposal, especially in the non-OECD countries, is a particular challenge for the Environment and health protection.¹ The european Community has therefore put in place the Directive 2002/96/EG for electrical and electronic waste Equipment (WEEE-Directive) on 13th February 2003.²

Recycling of CRT-Glass – Results of a Market Study and Future Szenarios
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2010)
Electrical and electronic equipment represents with 9 million/tons/year the fastest growing waste stream in Europe. Since 2003 the WEEE-Directive (2002/96/EC) promotes reuse, recy-cling and other forms of recovery with collection targets and targets for re-use and recycling. The directive implies a producer responsibility for financing the waste management. Today most of the EOL-CRT-glass is recycled closed-loop. After the required treatment the cullet is sent to CRT-producers mainly in Middle-Asia. But the European market for CRT-appliances nearly seems closed. Worldwide, CRT-producers gave up the production within last years. Even if until today developing countries represent a market for CRT-appliances an appre-ciable decrease in the production is feared.

De-Contamination of Small Waste Electrical and Electronic Appliances (sWEEE) in Austria
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2010)
Minimum treatment requirements for Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) are laid down by the Directive 2002/96/EC (WEEE Directive, last amended by 2008/34/EC). Annex II (1) to the Directive specifies 15 substances, preparations and components in total, which as a minimum have to be removed from any separately collected WEEE (Depollution). The following components can be part of small Electrical and Electronic Equipment (sWEEE): capacitors (all PCB-containing capacitors and electrolyte capacitors), batteries, printed circuit boards, toner cartridges, liquid crystal displays, mercury containing components, such as switches or backlighting lamps, asbestos-containing components, components containing refractory ceramic fibres, components containing radioactive substances, plastic-containing brominated flame retardants and external electric cables.

The long arm of the East: China keen to get hold of German electronic scrap
© Deutscher Fachverlag (DFV) (6/2010)
In future, energy and resource efficiency, as well as principles of closed loop recycling management will set the political agenda more than short-term economic growth. Germany is more than just a role model -- it will also be attractive as a supplier of raw materials for the Middle Kingdom.

Low-energy lamps create problem waste: The fate of the light bulb is sealed in Europe
© Deutscher Fachverlag (DFV) (6/2010)
After 130 years, Europe bids farewell to the incandescent light bulb. Conventional bulbs are too inefficient, too expensive, and too harmful to the climate. But the switch to low-energy lamps is not without consequences for the environment -- not, at least, as long as there is no adequate disposal system for the mercury contained in the new lamps. All low-energy lamps, most of which are manufactured in Asia, contain the poisonous heavy metal mercury.

 1  2 >
Username:

Password:

 Keep me signed in

Forgot your password?