Private Party Standing and EU Risk Regulation
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (9/2016)
Standing determines a person’s ability to obtain judicial review of a legal act by the government. Judicial review of EU measures, including risk regulatory measures, is an important device to ensure that the rule of law is respected. Even after the changes brought about by the Lisbon Treaty, private parties still have limited standing rights under EU law to challenge EU risk regulations.While they are able to challenge “decisions” addressed to them (or, in some cases, addressed to others), they generally have been unable to claim standing at the European courts to seek reviewof generally binding rules. These restricted standing rights for private parties have been the subject of debate and criticism, both before and after the changes brought about by the Lisbon Treaty.

The Market for Mechanical Biological Waste Treatment Plants in Europe
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Both the number and capacities of mechanical biological treatment plants (MBT plants) have increased significantly in the past years. In late 2015, about 490 MBT plants were active in Europe, reaching a disposal capacity of circa 47 million annual tons. However, despite its steady growth, the MBT market showed volatility. The market development peaked in 2005/2006, with the commissioning of about 80 plants with a capacity of circa 9 million annual tons. In 2015, about 13 new facilities with a capacity of around 2.2 million annual tons went online. The MBT market has also shifted geographically, because the European countries have started implementing the EU Landfill Directive in different years. After MBT plants had mainly been constructed in Southern Europe, Germany and Austria before 2006, investments shifted towards the UK and more recently, towards Eastern Europe. In the coming years, an ambivalent development is expected. Whereas further MBT plants will be constructed in countries still sending large shares of their MSW to landfills, MBT technology will experience increasing pressure in the countries with low landfilling shares.

Refuse Derived Fuel – A European Market Heading for Overcapacity
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
During the last five years, the residual waste market has been transformed from one whose geography was largely defined by a country’s borders to one that has become truly European in nature. Increasing, and now significant, tonnages of refuse derived fuel (RDF) and solid recovered fuel (SRF) are moving across national boundaries. In the UK, for example, the export of RDF and SRF has grown from 250,000 tonnes per annum (tpa) in 2011 to 3.4 million tpa in 2015.

New Waste-to-Energy Facility Energy Works Hull, United Kingdom
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Energy Works Hull (the Project) is a milestone project for the UK’s waste and renewable energy sector. It will be one of the largest gasification facilities receiving MSW in the UK, indeed in Europe. It is one of the first advanced conversion technology Projects to receive its renewable electricity subsidies through a Contract for Difference, the mechanism by which the UK Government determined to move from Renewable Obligation Certificates following its Electricity Market Reform process. It also plays a significant part of the urban regeneration of the City of Hull. The level of community engagement and benefit has resulted in the project receiving a GBP19.9M grant from the European Union’s Regional Development Fund.

Current Developments in European Waste-to-Energy
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
In December 2015, one year after withdrawing the first Circular Economy package, the Juncker Commission published a broader and more ambitious proposal with revised targets and harmonized calculation methods for recycling. In parallel, the European Commission is still working on the Energy Union, a strategy that is the core of the institution’s work in which Waste-to-Energy will play a role. Finally, the Commission will publish a communication focused on Waste-to-Energy aiming to explore the opportunities offered by Waste-to-Energy, particularly with regard to synergies between resource and energy efficiencies by the end of 2016.

What the TTIP Leaks Mean for the On-going Negotiations and Future Agreement?
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (6/2016)
Time to Overcome TTIP’s many Informational Asymmetries

Evaluation of the Paris Climate Agreement According to a Global Standard of Transparency
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (3/2016)
The legal analysis of the COP 21, its results and prospects they open proposed in this paper is done according to a standard of transparency, in the context of a complex governance, that the theory of global administrative law aims to better understand. This assessment shows that the balance between transparency and opacity, intelligibility, effectiveness or Efficiency is both delicate to establish and unstable. If the way the cursor was positioned under the Paris Agreement may seem unsatisfactory, it must not be forgotten that it is intended to evolve.

Review of the Best Available Techniques (BAT) Reference Document (BREF) for Waste Incineration – Current Status and Trends –
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (12/2015)
Synopsis of presentation by the Joint Research Centre’s European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) Bureau

Waste to Energy: A Sustainable Energy Strategy
© Eigenbeiträge der Autoren (9/2015)
In February 2015 the European Commission presented the highly anticipated Energy Union Package and by the end of 2015 a “more ambitious” Circular Economy proposal is to be introduced.

Europe’s Policy Framework for Promoting Offshore Wind Energy: Lessons for Taiwan and Other Countries
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (4/2015)
As a result of the recent proliferation of onshore renewable energy (RE) infrastructure in many developed countries around the world, related environmental and public concerns have arisen. Consequently, to facilitate further growth in RE, especially after the Fukushima accident of 2011, these and other countries are considering options for developing RE infrastructure offshore, or in less controversial spaces. Offshore wind farms (OWFs), for example, present a viable option for their energy policy. Europe, in particular, has emerged in recent years as a pioneer in facilitating large-scale deployments of OWFs.

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