Measures to Implement an Advanced Waste Management System in the Czech Republic
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
The Czech Republic is now preparing the new complete revision of waste law. The transformation of the waste management into the circular economy started through the legislative process in June 2016. Waste management plan of the Czech Republic for 2015 to 2024 clearly specifies waste strategy and priorities for the country. Thus, in the Act on waste the ban on landfilling of recyclable and recoverable waste in 2024, obligatory separate collection of main municipal waste streams including biowaste since 2015 and currently proposed increase of waste landfilling tax with strict recycling targets already in 2018 are only the first milestones leading to smarter waste future in the Czech Republic.

Wrong Tracks in Waste Management
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Waste Management is ubiquitous in our everyday life. Economic prosperity and the abundance of materialistic goods imply the generation of waste. In parallel the public awareness for environmentally sound solutions in the field of waste management is raising. This context imposes challenging conditions for political leaders. Often politicians are confronted to take decisions about concepts or investments in waste management without independent expertise. They are approached by vendors of waste treatment technologies or concepts, claiming high environmental and energetic performance, combined with profitable cost – benefit rates.

Development of Waste-to-Energy Projects
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
The first objective of waste management must always be to protect society and the health of individuals from harmful substances contained in the waste. Along the various methods around the globe with which waste has been treated the waste pyramid or waste management hierarchy has become widely accepted as the governing principle for waste management in modern societies. These principles have also been integrated in the European waste framework directive 2008/98/EC. At the bottom of the pyramid lays disposal of waste, meaning it is the least favourable option to treat a primary waste. However this does not mean implementing the waste pyramid prohibits disposal. It merely means that before disposal all other meaningful options are exhausted, and the quantity has been minimized.

Waste Management in India and Experience with the Implementation of Projects Based on Public Private Partnership Model
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Decades of improper Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Management has resulted in the creation of huge dumpsites in cities. These dumpsites are causing considerable environmental pollution and are full to capacity in most cities. Land for new disposal sites is not easily available due to increasing urbanization and population pressure. In many cases there is considerable protest from surrounding villages for setting up of a new MSW disposal site.

Europe’s Policy Framework for Promoting Offshore Wind Energy: Lessons for Taiwan and Other Countries
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (4/2015)
As a result of the recent proliferation of onshore renewable energy (RE) infrastructure in many developed countries around the world, related environmental and public concerns have arisen. Consequently, to facilitate further growth in RE, especially after the Fukushima accident of 2011, these and other countries are considering options for developing RE infrastructure offshore, or in less controversial spaces. Offshore wind farms (OWFs), for example, present a viable option for their energy policy. Europe, in particular, has emerged in recent years as a pioneer in facilitating large-scale deployments of OWFs.

When Science Meets Responsibility
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (6/2014)
The Major Risks Commission and the L’Aquila Earthquake.

Risk and Crisis Communication Recommendations for Industry Based on Advances in Cognitive Behavioral Science Research
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (6/2014)
Advances in cognitive behavioral science have enhanced the understanding and development of both internal and external company risk communications. The gold standard for risk communication is to ensure that normative analysis identifying the information most relevant to the specific choices facing recipients has been conducted prior to any communication effort. It is all too often that this standard is not met, and particularly within private sector organizations. Communication specialists within organizations are primarily tasked with information delivery, and do not have the resources or expertise to carry out the necessary risk perception research needed to ensure that communications are even being interpreted as intended,much less resulting in desirable decision-making and behavioral outcomes.

Waste to energy in Indonesia
© WtERT Germany GmbH (6/2014)
This report investigates the potential of waste-to-energy (WtE) technologies as a solution to Indonesia’s growing waste and energy challenges, and offers recommendations that address barriers to deployment. © The Carbon Trust 2014. All rights reserved.

Report of the Task Force on Waste to Energy (Volume I)
© WtERT Germany GmbH (5/2014)
The purpose of this report is to identify technically feasible, financially affordable and environmentally sound processing and disposal technologies for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) and assess, evaluate and recommend systems, processes, technological options, financial mechanisms and institutional arrangements to enhance resource recovery and promote Waste to Energy (W to E) technologies while ensuring integrated management of MSW in India. © Planning Commission, Government of India. All rights reserved.

Incorporating Social Sciences in Public Risk Assessment and Risk Management Organisations
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (3/2014)
The objective of the article is to analyse the use of Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS) in public risk assessment and risk management organisations in France, Germany, the UK, the Netherlands, Canada and the United States based on more than a hundred interviews conducted with social sciences experts employed by or working for these organisations. If the added value brought by the integration of social scientists is recognised, the use of social sciences differs from one organisation to another. The article compares the different positions given to social scientists inside and outside the organisation, the various methods used and the different contents produced. The survey highlights a set of initiatives that are scattered, differentiated and ultimately have little in common - except that they often play a marginal role in the main activities of the agencies concerned.

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