How to Optimize Recycling Rates Using Waste Incineration
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
The improvement of recycling and reuse of waste is becoming more and more important and it is generally preferred compared to waste incineration. In fact, the incineration of waste is often considered the last alternative when recycling of a certain waste fraction is technically not possible or there is simply no market for the corresponding fraction of the waste. But instead of considering waste incineration as being contradictory to recycling, it may also be considered as an alternative way to achieve higher recycling rates. The main goal of waste to energy is the use of the chemical energy contained in the carbon and drogen, and transfer this into thermal energy. But all other elements contained in the waste will of course also be found in the various residue streams leaving the plant. For these residue streams there are possibilities for further treatment, enabling Separation of certain elements, improvement of the quality of a residue stream to allow re-use on the market or even potential for the preparation of a new product.

Development of Waste-to-Energy Projects
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
The first objective of waste management must always be to protect society and the health of individuals from harmful substances contained in the waste. Along the various methods around the globe with which waste has been treated the waste pyramid or waste management hierarchy has become widely accepted as the governing principle for waste management in modern societies. These principles have also been integrated in the European waste framework directive 2008/98/EC. At the bottom of the pyramid lays disposal of waste, meaning it is the least favourable option to treat a primary waste. However this does not mean implementing the waste pyramid prohibits disposal. It merely means that before disposal all other meaningful options are exhausted, and the quantity has been minimized.

Current Developments in European Waste-to-Energy
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
In December 2015, one year after withdrawing the first Circular Economy package, the Juncker Commission published a broader and more ambitious proposal with revised targets and harmonized calculation methods for recycling. In parallel, the European Commission is still working on the Energy Union, a strategy that is the core of the institution’s work in which Waste-to-Energy will play a role. Finally, the Commission will publish a communication focused on Waste-to-Energy aiming to explore the opportunities offered by Waste-to-Energy, particularly with regard to synergies between resource and energy efficiencies by the end of 2016.

Waste to energy in Indonesia
© WtERT Germany GmbH (6/2014)
This report investigates the potential of waste-to-energy (WtE) technologies as a solution to Indonesia’s growing waste and energy challenges, and offers recommendations that address barriers to deployment. © The Carbon Trust 2014. All rights reserved.

Report of the Task Force on Waste to Energy (Volume I)
© WtERT Germany GmbH (5/2014)
The purpose of this report is to identify technically feasible, financially affordable and environmentally sound processing and disposal technologies for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) and assess, evaluate and recommend systems, processes, technological options, financial mechanisms and institutional arrangements to enhance resource recovery and promote Waste to Energy (W to E) technologies while ensuring integrated management of MSW in India. © Planning Commission, Government of India. All rights reserved.

bifa-Text No. 62: Ecoefficiency analysis of photovoltaic modules / english version
© bifa Umweltinstitut GmbH (2/2014)
The study by the bifa environmental institute describes a future-orientated view of the ecological and economic effects of photovoltaic (PV) systems along their whole life cycle.

Energy from waste - A guide to the debate
© WtERT Germany GmbH (2/2014)
The purpose of this guide is to provide a starting point for discussions about the role energy from waste might have in managing waste. This role will always be dependent on specific circumstances therefore this guide does not attempt to give all the answers. However, it does highlight questions that should be asked, options that are available, and the process for making decisions and influencing them. © Crown copyright 2014

Waste Management Research in a Future Megacity - Experiences from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (10/2012)
The article explores the current situation of the waste management system in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. As in most urban centers in developing countries, in Addis Ababa the fate of postconsumer materials, organic waste and other residuals is not well known. This is a result of the lack of a system of data collection throughout the waste management chain. Since there is no systematic recording and assessment of the amount of waste collected and transporte by the municipal or private enterprises, and the final disposal site lacks a weighing bridge to register the amount of residues landfilled, there is almost no robust data that helps assess the performance of the waste management system.

Requirements for High Quality Recovery in German Waste Legislation
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (10/2012)
The centre of German waste legislation is formed by the so-called Kreislaufwirtschaftsgesetz, (ff. abbrev. KrWG) translating approximately to "cycle waste management act". This new legal provision is to implement the Waste Framework Directive (WFD)¹ and one of its main features - the European waste hierarchy - into German law. The criterion of high quality recovery or rather the priority of high quality recovery is to be found in §² 8 III S. 3 KrWG and mirrors § 5 II S. 3 of the former cycle waste management and waste act (Kreislaufwirtschafts- und Abfallgesetz ff. abbrev. Krw-/AbfG).

7. Entrepreneurship, EQF 3 Premium
© AIRE (Adapting and installing an international vocational training for renewable energy) (1/2012)
Which knowledge, skills and competences does an AIRE specialist need as far as running a company, finding the most economical solutions and calculating projects is concerned?

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