Preliminary impact assessment of anthropogenic activities on Vourkadi peri-urban lagoon system
© Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (6/2009)
Vourkadi wetland is one of the few remaining peri-urban wetlands in Attica Region. During the last 3 decades the entire area has undergone significant urban and industrial development resulting to environmental degradation and large scale land cover changes. The particular scientific effort concerns an initial attempt to identify potential impacts from current land uses and assess the disturbances in the water quality and geomorphology of the area.

Economic aspects of the delineation of well head protection areas under conditions of uncertainty
© Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (6/2009)
The determination of wellhead protection areas is a matter of major importance especially for wells supplying water for domestic use, since it allows water resources managers and local authorities to impose measures over the development of agricultural or industrial activities that could somehow affect the quality of groundwater.

Short-term toxicity of industrial chemicals on biological sentinels in water and sediment
© Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (6/2009)
Acute toxic effects of two industrial chemicals on fish and shrimp were assessed using the methods # 203 and 218 respectively derived from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The indiscriminate release of these chemicals into the Niger Delta environment of Nigeria gives the impetus for this assessment. The results showed that there was a difference in toxicity between fresh and brackish water fish (Tilapia guineensis) and shrimp (Desmoscaris tripsinosa; Palaemonetes africanus). There was also a significant difference between mortality in Neatex (industrial detergent), Norust CR 486 (corrosion inhibitor) and the control treatments at p < 0.05 for the water and sediment toxicity test. The findings in this study calls for regular surveillance of the environment since most of the chemicals released are absorbed by sediment particles causing harm first to the living organisms in the sediment and secondly to the overlying waters.

Using a polymer and fly ash for developing a non-conventional sorbent
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2008)
The generation of solid residues is a global problem with severe implications for the environment and industry. On the one hand, high storage, transport and disposal costs of wastes must be faced by industrial producers and on the other hand, toxic substances leaching through the soil to the groundwater may negatively impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems due to trace elements contained in solid residues. Nowadays, industry is very interested in the reuse of solid wastes, therefore many investigations are aimed to find new applications for waste use as new raw materials and energy sources.

Hydrodechlorination of PCBs-contaminated soils and groundwaters
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2008)
As in most South American countries, the magnitude of the Chilean contaminated site problem is yet to be established. To date, only two studies have been conducted for the identification and preliminary risk assessment of sites under suspicion of contamination, considering the associated human health and environmental risks. The latter work is a case study in an industrial Region in South Central Chile, the second most important in social and economic terms.

LEACHING BEHAVIOUR OF PAH’S IN DEMOLITION WASTE AND CONTAMINATED SOIL Premium
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
The investigation of pollutant transfer from waste or soil with leachate into groundwater is of fundamental importance for the assessment of risk potential posed by abandoned waste deposits or other contaminated sites. Following the German Federal Soil Protection and Contaminated Sites Ordinance (BBodSchV, 1999), a leachate forecast is required for the soil-groundwater pathway. The estimation of the pollutant transfer can be performed, among other methods, on the basis of source term strength of contaminated materials determination by laboratory tests.

ASSESSMENT AND REMEDIATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM CONTAMINATED SITE – A CASE STUDY
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
The environmental contamination of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) has emerged as a major area of concern in the recent years. Cr6+ is one of the highly toxic carcinogenic substances and is released to environmnt through a number of industrial operations which process or use ores and various comounds of chromium. The wastes and residues generated from such industries (e.g., sludge, fly ash, slag, etc.) contain significant concentrations of Cr6+, and were used in the past as a fill material at numerous locations (Salunkhe et al., 1998). The Cr6+, being highly soluble in water, has been leaching from many such sites and seepage of leachate through subsurface in to the groundwater has posed a considerable health hazard in the vicinity of such sites.

EVALUATION OF CAPACITANCE PROBES FOR MOISTURE MONITORING IN MUNICIPAL LANDFILLS
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
There exist many municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, that have been designed using the “dry-tomb” concept, that are either closed or in their final stages of waste addition. The purpose of this design is to isolate the waste from the exterior environment thereby preventing the degradation of the landfill contents and its introduction to the surroundings. This design, however, carries with it a long-term liability. The slow decay of MSW causes a long “contaminating lifespan” during which pollutants may gradually enter the groundwater and methane production will proceed at a rate too low to be utilized economically thus contributing to greenhouse gas emissions. The length of this lifespan cannot be known exactly, but modelling suggests times of a hundred years or more after closure are not unreasonable. (Rowe, 2001)

METAL SPECIATION IN NINE FRENCH LANDFILL LEACHATES
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Several heavy metals or metalloids, that may be present in landfill leachates, are considered as priority pollutants for groundwater resources (for example lead, cadmium, nickel; OJEC, 2001). While the fate and transport of such elements are largely influenced by chemical speciation reactions, landfill risk assessments generally adopt a simplified “Kd” approach which assumes steady-state liquid-solid partition between the liquid and solid phases. Such simplification may result in a severe overestimation of long-term environmental or health impact. Speciation reactions such as precipitation or co-precipitation participate in the natural attenuation of landfill leachate and help explain why heavy metals are rarely detected in groundwater at significant distances from landfills (Christensen et al., 2001).

NEW METHODOLOGY FOR GROUNDWATER MONITORING AT OPERATIONAL LANDFILLS BASED ON NATURAL ATTENUATION, RESULTS OF TWO FULL SCALE DEMONSTRATION PROLJECTS AT THE LANDFILLS UDEN AND ARMHOEDE (NL)
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
At this moment the Netherlands is still counting around 70 existing landfills, which are partly in operation and partly recently closed (aftercare phase). The exploitation and aftercare of these landfills are regulated by the European Union in the Council Directive 1999/31/EC of 26 April 1999 on the landfill of waste. In practice this means the complete isolation of the landfilled waste to its environment by means of bottom and top liner systems combined with everlasting aftercare (a/o groundwater monitoring). This is the best solution considering the actual state of art, however the waste itself remains a source of pollution and the problem is not solved related to the source.

<  1  2  3 >
Username:

Password:

 Keep me signed in

Forgot your password?