6. Customer Service, EQF 3 Premium
© AIRE (Adapting and installing an international vocational training for renewable energy) (1/2012)
Which knowledge, skills and competences does an AIRE specialist need as far as customer service, advising and councelling is concerned?

4. Safety, EQF 3 Premium
© AIRE (Adapting and installing an international vocational training for renewable energy) (1/2012)
Which knowledge, skills and competences does an AIRE specialist need as far as safety, security and risk prevention is concerned?

3. Other Forms of Energy, EQF 3 Premium
© AIRE (Adapting and installing an international vocational training for renewable energy) (1/2012)
Which knowledge, skills and competences does an AIRE specialist need as far as usual forms of energy are concerned?

1.3 Wind Power, EQF 3 Premium
© AIRE (Adapting and installing an international vocational training for renewable energy) (1/2012)
Which knowledge, skills and competences does an AIRE specialist need in the field of Wind Power?

The Impact of Electricity Market Design on Access to the Grid and Transmission Planning for Renewable Energy in Australia: Can Overseas Examples Provide Guidance?
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (9/2011)
The question of who pays for grid augmentation and strategic building of new infrastructure is likely to be central for the successful integration of renewable energy on a large scale in Australia. Other countries, such as Germany, have recognised the public interest component of a high renewable energy percentage. That realisation is reflected not only in the extensive grid access and augmentation provisions, but also in the special norms introduced to make offshore wind a viable option. The lack of environmental objectives in Australian electricity market law makes similar arrangements difficult.

Editorial Board Commentary: Further Improved Framework Conditions for Wind Power in Germany since 2009
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (3/2011)
By the end of 2010, the total installed wind energy capacity in Germany was 27,214 MW, of which 1,551 MW was added in 2010.1 In 2009, 1,917 MW were added, indicating a year-over-year reduction in installation of 19 % from 2009 to 2010. The number of plants increased by 754 MW in 2010; overall there were 21,607 wind power turbines installed. Wind energy has extended its leading position among renewables, and now accounts for more than 7 % of gross electricity consumption in Germany, which is about half of all electricity generated from renewables (16.4 % of gross electricity consumption in 2010). The proportion of wind in the energy mix in Germany is expected to grow in the future.

Wind Energy in China: From Ad hoc Projects to Strategic Policy
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (3/2011)
This paper investigates the major driving forces behind China’s wind energy policy transformation, including the Renewable Energy Law (REL), the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), and the increased participation of stakeholders like large stateowned enterprises (SOEs), government-organized non-governmental organizations, and multinational companies. Much of the data collected in this paper was gathered from interviews with senior officials in the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), large SOEs, and other influential public and private actors in the Chinese wind energy sector. This paper presents three findings: First, Chinese wind policy has shifted from supporting ad hoc projects to developing strategic policies. Second, critical problems remain unsolved in projects and policies involving the CDM. shird, the central government is no longer the sole influential actor in China’s wind policy, with other stakeholders playing an increasingly critical role.

Too Close for Comfort: Social Controversies Surrounding Wind Farm Noise Setback Policies in Ontario
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (10/2010)
This paper examines the policies, regulations and social controversies surrounding wind farm noise in Ontario. Through a case study of Ontario’s wind power regulatory and policy development, we ask how and why noise became a controversy for wind development.

Wind Theft, Spatial Planning and International Relations
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (7/2010)
The evolution of renewable energy technologies and the rapid growth in renewable energy facilities are giving rise to a growing number of actual and potential conflicts. This paper explores one particular area of conflict: the access to the resource itself.

Renewable Energy from the Ocean and Tides: A Viable Renewable Energy Resource in Search of a Suitable Regulatory Framework
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (12/2009)
Over the past few years there has been significant international interest in the development of offshore wind energy as a source of renewable energy especially in Europe. However, the wind is not the only source of renewable energy in offshore areas. The broad suite of technologies collectively known as ocean energy are also beginning to emerge as a viable base-load source of renewable energy. Ocean energy technology involves a wide range of engineering technologies that are able to obtain energy from the ocean using a variety of conversion mechanisms including hydrokinetic energy (where the energy of ocean (or fluvial) currents and tides is captured by devices which are installed under the surface of the water); wave energy (where the energy of the surface wind waves is used to produce electricity by a variety of devices installed on the surface of the sea); ocean thermal energy or OTEC (which uses the temperature differential between cold water from the deep ocean and warm surface water) and; Osmotic energy (which relates to the pressure differential between salt and fresh water).

<  1  2  3 >
Username:

Password:

 Keep me signed in

Forgot your password?