The Eco-Patent Commons and Environmental Technology Transfer: Implications for Efforts to Tackle Climate Change
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (4/2010)
This article explores the potential role and pitfalls of corporate initiatives related to access to intellectual property in the transfer of environmentally friendly technology especially to developing countries. An initial investigation of how patents can affect environmentally beneficial technology transfer is forwarded, contrasting the approaches of the public and private sector in the encouragement of environmentally beneficial technology transfer. A wide variety of potential influences are analyzed, with specific focus being placed on the eco-patent commons project, the international encouragement of clean technologies, patent pools, open source systems, and enabled invention disclosures. This is analyzed in the context of the quest to encourage climate-friendly technologies.

Technology Transfer in the International Climate Negotiations – The State of Play and Suggestions for the Way Forward
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (4/2010)
Facilitating the transfer of climate technologies is one of the main elements of the ongoing climate change negotiations. Despite limited progress overall during COP 15 in Copenhagen, clear progress has been made on the issue of technology transfer. Challenging issues remain for future negotiations, but consensus is evident on several important features, including the establishment of a technology mechanism and a new green climate fund. This article assesses the current state of the technology negotiations and draws lessons from experience and the academic literature to provide recommendations for the implementation of these proposed, new institutional mechanisms.

Technology Transfer and Financing: Issues for Long Term Climate Policy in Developing Countries
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (10/2009)
Climate change is generally recognized as the central environmental problem facing the globe. Evidence is building that impacts are being felt in the form of melting icecaps in the polar areas and increased variability of temperature, rainfall and storms in virtually all regions. The scientific consensus underpinning the rising political and public recognition of the climate problem has been captured in the recent reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). While developed countries are responsible for the bulk of accumulated emissions, developing countries shares have been growing in recent years.

bifa-Text Nr. 42: CDM - Clean Development Mechanism in the waste management sector
© bifa Umweltinstitut GmbH (10/2009)
An analysis of potentials and barriers within the present methodological framework

Governance Reform of the Clean Development Mechanism after Poznan
© Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (4/2009)
The Clean Development Mechanism is the first international attempt to address climate change using a global emissions trading market mechanism involving both developed and developing countries. When it was originally created, it could not have been envisaged that it would become so large and lucrative so quickly, creating a market in a regulated commodity that would be worth billions of euros. In 2007, the value of the CDM market was estimated to total approximately €12 billion, more than double the previous year’s figure. There are currently more than 1240 registered CDM projects in 51 countries, with approximately 3000 further projects in the fast-growing registration pipeline.

Open windrow composting manual
© Bauhaus-Universität Weimar - Professur für Abfallwirtschaft (12/2008)
In times when mineral fertilizer is not available or too expensive, compost is the most important source to provide nutrients for the plants and to adjust the soil conditions. Today many people appreciate compost as a natural source for nutrients and humus. To compost materials means also to close the natural circle of life. This manual tries to give a helping hand in designing and maintaining a composting plant in economically developing countries.

CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLID WASTE AFTER MECHANICAL BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT (MBT) PROCESS FOR 5 AND 9 MONTHS: A CASE STUDY OF PHITSANULOK, THAILAND
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
In early 1999, the Solid Waste Management Project for the Phitsanulok Municipality was started. The main focus of the first phase of the technical assistance project between the Municipality of Phitsanulok and the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) (1999- 2002) was to develop a model for a sustainable solid waste management system for the city in cooperation with the municipal administration, citizens and the private sector (Kassmann, 2005).

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO THE MEXICAN GOVERNMENT IN ENVIRONMENTAL DATA PROCESSING
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Technical Cooperation in environmental engineering between the Federal Government of Mexico and the Federal Government of Germany has been going on for more than fifteen years. One of the current assistance projects is a four year program, called “Environmental protection and sustainable use of natural resources”. This program contains a component, called “Environmental information system and monitoring”. It is managed by a working group that consists of members of the Mexican Ministry for the Environment (SEMARNAT, see abbreviations) and of local and international experts.

USING RESEARCH TO INFORM WASTE AND RESOURCES POLICY
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
The concept of a knowledge-based approach to policy making (also referred to as ‘evidencebased policy making’ or ‘science meets policy’) has been around for more than 10 years, and is both widely regarded as a ‘good thing’ and ‘signed up to’ by Governments; however putting the concept into practice has proven challenging and is still evolving.

A REVIEW OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING NEEDS FOR WASTE PROFESSIONALS
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Waste management has historically suffered from an image of dirty work on dirty sites carried out by poorly qualified people. It has traditionally been viewed as a public service, focused on efficient collection and disposal, and as such, it may not have been considered as a dynamic career opportunity in the past. Whilst this image may have been appropriate in an age when disposal was the main focus; dilute and disperse was the accepted “pollution control” technique and waste sites were largely unlicensed and uncontrolled, this is no longer the case and the industry can now lay claim to being one of the most dynamic and fast-changing business sectors.

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