International Experience of Risks Sharing between Public and Private Entities in Energy-from-Waste Plants Construction

Imagine that you are the mayor of a city named Metropolis and are in Charge of School logistics. Before doing so, you might have to ask yourself a few essential questions. What kind of transportation will you provide? Who will it benefit: students, staff or both? Where will the service be provided? When will it be provided: in the evening, morning? And finally, how much will it cost? All these essential questions need to be answered before starting to implement this project and to buy your buses. By doing so, planning, financing, building and operating the chosen mean of Transportation will become an easier task. After that, your political decisions will direct the choice of implication of private sector on the different aspects of your project.

The Energy from Waste plants (EfW) are large infrastructure projects dealing both withthe Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management, but also with the energy production. Let’s try to answer some questions to better understand their specific characteristics, referring also to our example from Daily life concerning the school transport from
Metropolis City indicated in our introduction.



Copyright: © TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft
Source: Waste Management, Volume 6 (September 2016)
Pages: 20
Price: € 20,00
Autor: Christophe Cord´Homme

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