Potentialities of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) project for Brazilian National Policy on Solid Waste and National Policy on Climate Change implementation

Climate change (CC) and municipal solid waste (MSW) management have common demands to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The MSW disposal represent more than 20% of anthropogenic methane (CH4) (IPCC, 2005). The estimated contribution of this sector in anthropogenic GHG emissions is 3-5% (UNEP, 2010), and has great potential for reducing fuel and energy consumption in collection and treatment of CH4 avoided emissions in landfills by biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) diversion to biodigestion and composting, and fix carbon in soils by compost or biofertilizers produced application, and reduce natural resources extraction by multi-material recycling.

In Brazil, the National Policy on Solid Waste - PNRS, is being implemented with goals of close open dumps, selective collection and reverse logistics with socio-productive inclusion of waste pickers (BRAZIL, 2010). 51.4% from the MSW generated is biodegradable matter. In 2012, 57.98% of the waste disposed of ade quately, while 42.02% were inappropriate target (ABRELPE, 2012). The Brazil recycles 2% of MSW, only 0.8% of the BMW. 98% by the work of about 800,000 waste pickers. Although the National Policy on Climate Change - PNMC, set goals for the CH4 recovery from MSW treatment facilities and recycling expansion to 20% until 2015, the sector was not covered by the national strategy. Considering a NAMA an opportunity for financial and technological support from community international to Brazil forward in reducing their domestic emissions, this work aims to demonstrate the potential of the waste sector, and valuation of BMW as a compliance strategy to PNRS and PNMC.



Copyright: © European Compost Network ECN e.V.
Source: Orbit 2014 (Juni 2014)
Pages: 0
Price: € 0,00
Autor: Karina Souza

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